audit

Good Records Are The Key To Tax Deductions And Trouble-Free IRS Audits

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If you operate a small business, or you’re starting a new one, you probably know you need to keep records of your income and expenses. In particular, you should carefully record your expenses in order to claim the full amount of the tax deductions to which you’re entitled. And you want to make sure you can defend the amounts reported on your tax returns if you’re ever audited by the IRS or state tax agencies.

Certain types of expenses, such as automobile, travel, meals and office-at-home expenses, require special attention because they’re subject to special recordkeeping requirements or limitations on deductibility.

It’s interesting to note that there’s not one way to keep business records. In its publication “Starting a Business and Keeping Records,” the IRS states: “Except in a few cases, the law does not require any specific kind of records. You can choose any recordkeeping system suited to your business that clearly shows your income and expenses.”

That being […]

By |June 16th, 2020|audit, business, irs|0 Comments

The Chances of an IRS Audit are Low, But Business Owners Should be Prepared

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Many business owners ask: How can I avoid an IRS audit? The good news is that the odds against being audited are in your favor. In fiscal year 2018, the IRS audited approximately 0.6% of individuals. Businesses, large corporations and high-income individuals are more likely to be audited but, overall, audit rates are historically low.

There’s no 100% guarantee that you won’t be picked for an audit, because some tax returns are chosen randomly. However, completing your returns in a timely and accurate fashion with our firm certainly works in your favor. And it helps to know what might catch the attention of the IRS.

Audit red flags

A variety of tax-return entries may raise red flags with the IRS and may lead to an audit. Here are a few examples:

  • Significant inconsistencies between previous years’ filings and your most current filing,
  • Gross profit margin or expenses markedly different from those of other businesses in your industry, and
  • Miscalculated or unusually high deductions.

Certain types of deductions may be questioned by the IRS because there are strict record-keeping requirements for them • for example, auto and travel expense deductions. In addition, an owner-employee salary that’s inordinately higher or […]

By |September 30th, 2019|audit, business, irs|0 Comments

Businesses Can Utilize the Same Information IRS Auditors Use to Examine Tax Returns

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The IRS uses Audit Techniques Guides (ATGs) to help IRS examiners get ready for audits. Your business can use the same guides to gain insight into what the IRS is looking for in terms of compliance with tax laws and regulations.

Many ATGs target specific industries or businesses, such as construction, aerospace, art galleries, child care providers and veterinary medicine. Others address issues that frequently arise in audits, such as executive compensation, passive activity losses and capitalization of tangible property.

How they’re used

IRS auditors need to examine all types of businesses, as well as individual taxpayers and tax-exempt organizations. Each type of return might have unique industry issues, business practices and terminology. Before meeting with taxpayers and their advisors, auditors do their homework to understand various industries or issues, the accounting methods commonly used, how income is received, and areas where taxpayers may not be in compliance.

By using a specific ATG, an auditor may be able to reconcile discrepancies when reported income or expenses aren’t consistent with what’s normal for the industry or to identify anomalies within the geographic area in which the business is located.

For example, one ATG focuses specifically on businesses […]

By |July 22nd, 2019|audit, business, irs, tax|0 Comments

M&A Transactions: Avoid Surprises from the IRS

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If you’re considering buying or selling a business — or you’re in the process of a merger or acquisition — it’s important that both parties report the transaction to the IRS in the same way. Otherwise, you may increase your chances of being audited.

If a sale involves business assets (as opposed to stock or ownership interests), the buyer and the seller must generally report to the IRS the purchase price allocations that both use. This is done by attaching IRS Form 8594, “Asset Acquisition Statement,” to each of their respective federal income tax returns for the tax year that includes the transaction.

What’s reported?

When buying business assets in an M&A transaction, you must allocate the total purchase price to the specific assets that are acquired. The amount allocated to each asset then becomes its initial tax basis. For depreciable and amortizable assets, the initial tax basis of each asset determines the depreciation and amortization deductions for that asset after the acquisition. Depreciable and amortizable assets include:

  • Equipment,
  • Buildings and improvements,
  • Software,
  • Furniture, fixtures and
  • Intangibles (including customer lists, licenses, patents, copyrights and goodwill).

In addition to reporting the items above, you must also disclose […]

By |July 9th, 2019|audit, depreciation, irs|0 Comments

The Chances of IRS Audit are Down But You Should Still be Prepared

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The IRS just released its audit statistics for the 2018 fiscal year, and fewer taxpayers had their returns examined as compared with prior years. However, even though a small percentage of tax returns are being chosen for audit these days, that will be little consolation if yours is one of them.

Latest statistics

Overall, just 0.59% of individual tax returns were audited in 2018, as compared with 0.62% in 2017. This was the lowest percentage of audits conducted since 2002.

However, as in the past, those with very high incomes face greater odds. For example, in 2018, 2.21% of taxpayers with adjusted gross incomes (AGIs) of between $1 million and $5 million were audited (down from 3.52% in 2017).

The richest taxpayers, those with AGIs of $10 million and more, experienced a steep decline in audits. In 2018, 6.66% of their returns were audited, compared with 14.52% in 2017.

By |June 3rd, 2019|audit, irs, tax planning, taxpayer|0 Comments

IRS Audit Techniques Guides Provide Clues to What May Come Up If Your Business is Audited

IRS examiners use Audit Techniques Guides (ATGs) to prepare for audits — and so can small business owners. Many ATGs target specific industries, such as construction. Others address issues that frequently arise in audits, such as executive compensation and fringe benefits. These publications can provide valuable insights into issues that might surface if your business is audited.

What do ATGs cover?

The IRS compiles information obtained from past examinations of taxpayers and publishes its findings in ATGs. Typically, these publications explain:

  • The nature of the industry or issue,
  • Accounting methods commonly used in an industry,
  • Relevant audit examination techniques,
  • Common and industry-specific compliance issues,
  • Business practices,
  • Industry terminology, and
  • Sample interview questions.

By using a specific ATG, an examiner may, for example, be able to reconcile discrepancies when reported income or expenses aren’t consistent with what’s normal for the industry or to identify anomalies within the geographic area in which the taxpayer resides.

What do ATGs advise?

ATGs cover the types of documentation IRS examiners should request from taxpayers and what relevant information might be uncovered during a tour of the business premises. These guides are intended in part to help examiners identify potential sources of income that could otherwise slip through the cracks.

Other issues […]

By |May 9th, 2018|audit, irs|0 Comments

Fewer IRS Audits Predicted for 2015

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In an email to employees, IRS Commissioner John Koskinen said the IRS will not be able to close as many audits in 2015 due to the agency’s budget cuts. With a reduction in enforcement personnel (they announced a hiring freeze in December), he indicated that there will likely be at least 46,000 fewer individual and business audit closures and more than 280,000 fewer collections from automated notices or field revenue agents. Additionally, two furlough days for IRS employees in 2015 may be planned. Furthermore, aging information technology systems will not be replaced, which could delay new taxpayer protections against identity theft. This announcement comes on the heels of a budget reduction for the agency of $346 million during the remaining nine months of the fiscal year ending 9/30/15, which, according to the Commissioner, is the lowest funding since 2008.

By |January 29th, 2015|audit, irs|0 Comments

Californians can expect Head of Household Audit Letters

The California Franchise Tax Board (FTB) has mailed more than 120,000 audit letters to taxpayers to verify their head of household (HOH) filing status on their 2011 state income tax returns. Each year, the FTB reviews the tax returns of taxpayers who claim the HOH filing status because the qualifications are commonly misunderstood. Taxpayers can generally claim the HOH filing status if they are unmarried, have cared for a qualified person for more than half the year, and paid more than half the cost of maintaining their home.

Taxpayers who do not qualify will have their tax reassessed using either the single or married-filing-separate filing status. Nearly 28,000 California taxpayers who claimed the HOH status last year did not meet its requirements. 
The FTB encourages taxpayers who receive an HOH audit letter to respond promptly by completing the enclosed questionnaire. Failure to respond could result in a tax assessment and penalty.
News Release, California Franchise Tax. Board, August 8, 2012