business

2020 Q1 Tax Calendar: Key Deadlines for Businesses and Other Employers

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Here are some of the key tax-related deadlines affecting businesses and other employers during the first quarter of 2020. Keep in mind that this list isn’t all-inclusive, so there may be additional deadlines that apply to you. Contact us to ensure you’re meeting all applicable deadlines and to learn more about the filing requirements.

January 31

  • File 2019 Forms W-2, “Wage and Tax Statement,” with the Social Security Administration and provide copies to your employees.
  • Provide copies of 2019 Forms 1099-MISC, “Miscellaneous Income,” to recipients of income from your business where required.
  • File 2019 Forms 1099-MISC reporting nonemployee compensation payments in Box 7 with the IRS.
  • File Form 940, “Employer’s Annual Federal Unemployment (FUTA) Tax Return,” for 2019. If your undeposited tax is $500 or less, you can either pay it with your return or deposit it. If it’s more than $500, you must deposit it. However, if you deposited the tax for the year in full and on time, you have until February 10 to file the return.
  • File Form 941, “Employer’s Quarterly Federal Tax Return,” to report Medicare, Social Security and income taxes withheld in the fourth quarter of 2019. If your tax liability is […]
By |January 10th, 2020|business|0 Comments

5 Ways to Strengthen Your Business for the New Year

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The end of one year and the beginning of the next is a great opportunity for reflection and planning. You have 12 months to look back on and another 12 ahead to look forward to. Here are five ways to strengthen your business for the new year by doing a little of both:

1. Compare 2019 financial performance to budget. Did you meet the financial goals you set at the beginning of the year? If not, why? Analyze variances between budget and actual results. Then, evaluate what changes you could make to get closer to achieving your objectives in 2020. And if you did meet your goals, identify precisely what you did right and build on those strategies.

2. Create a multiyear capital budget. Look around your offices or facilities at your equipment, software and people. What investments will you need to make to grow your business? Such investments can be both tangible (new equipment […]

By |January 10th, 2020|business|0 Comments

Do You Have a California Business That Collects Sales Tax?

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California businesses that collect sales tax from customers must correctly report the sales and remit the tax on time or face a possible 25% fraud penalty. The CA Dept. of Tax and Fee Administration (CDTFA) found that one restaurant owner significantly underreported sales and underpaid the related sales tax. On that basis, the CDTFA determined that he was not only subject to the 25% fraud penalty, but that he also met the criteria for a higher penalty of 40%. That is, evidence showed he knowingly collected sales tax to be remitted and failed to remit the full tax collected; also, the amount exceeded an established threshold. The CA Office of Tax Appeals upheld the penalty. If you have questions, please contact your Linkenheimer CPA.

By |December 11th, 2019|business, ca, CA tax, sales tax|0 Comments

Bridging the Gap Between Budgeting and Risk Management

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At many companies, a wide gap exists between the budgeting process and risk management. Failing to consider major threats could leave you vulnerable to high-impact hits to your budget if one or more of these dangers materialize. Here are some common types of risks to research, assess and incorporate into adjustments to next year’s budget:

Competitive. No business is an island (or a monopoly for that matter). The relative strength and strategies of your competitors affect how your company should shape its budget. For this reason, gathering competitive intelligence and acting accordingly is a must.

For example, if a larger competitor has moved into your market, you may need to allocate more funds for marketing and advertising. Then again, if a long-time rival has closed up shop, you might be able to keep those costs the same (or even lower them) and channel more money into production as business picks up.

Compliance.

By |November 26th, 2019|business, Financial Reporting Framework|0 Comments

The Tax Implications if Your Business Engages in Environmental Cleanup

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If your company faces the need to “remediate” or clean up environmental contamination, the money you spend can be deductible on your tax return as ordinary and necessary business expenses. Of course, you want to claim the maximum immediate income tax benefits possible for the expenses you incur.

These expenses may include the actual cleanup costs, as well as expenses for environmental studies, surveys and investigations, fees for consulting and environmental engineering, legal and professional fees, environmental “audit” and monitoring costs, and other expenses.

Current deductions vs. capitalized costs

Unfortunately, every type of environmental cleanup expense cannot be currently deducted. Some cleanup costs must be capitalized. But, generally, cleanup costs are currently deductible to the extent they cover:

  • “Incidental repairs” (for example, encapsulating exposed asbestos insulation); or
  • Cleaning up contamination that your business caused on your own property (for example, removing soil contaminated by dumping wastes from your own manufacturing processes, and replacing it with clean soil) — if you acquired that property in an uncontaminated state.

On the other hand, remediation costs generally have to be capitalized if the remediation:

  • Adds significantly to the value of the cleaned-up property,
  • Prolongs the useful life of the property,
  • Adapts the property […]

Affected by the Power Outages? Tax Relief May Be Available.

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Some tax relief is available for California taxpayers affected by the frequent power shutoffs that plague the state. The CA Franchise Tax Board is advising taxpayers impacted by the safety-related power blackouts that began in October 2019 that they may be eligible for penalty relief if the penalties are due to the shutoffs. Taxpayers in impacted counties may request penalty abatement upon a showing of reasonable cause. For details, go to https://bit.ly/2PzCN9r and arrow down to “Extended deadlines.” If you have questions about how the shut offs may have affected you or your business with concerns related to tax payments or penalties, please contact your Linkenheimer CPA. 

Small Businesses: Get Ready for Your 1099-MISC Reporting Requirements

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A month after the new year begins, your business may be required to comply with rules to report amounts paid to independent contractors, vendors and others. You may have to send 1099-MISC forms to those whom you pay non-employee compensation, as well as file copies with the IRS. This task can be time consuming and there are penalties for not complying, so it’s a good idea to begin gathering information early to help ensure smooth filing.

Deadline

There are many types of 1099 forms. For example, 1099-INT is sent out to report interest income and 1099-B is used to report broker transactions and barter exchanges. Employers must provide a Form 1099-MISC for non-employee compensation by January 31, 2020, to each non-corporate service provider who was paid at least $600 for services during 2019. (1099-MISC forms generally don’t have to be provided to corporate service providers, although there are exceptions.)

A copy of each Form 1099-MISC with payments listed in box […]

By |November 11th, 2019|1099, business, employer|0 Comments

Some California Employers in Sonoma and Los Angeles Counties Get Extra Time for Tax Responsibilities

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Some California employers in Sonoma and Los Angeles Counties get extra time for tax responsibilities, says the CA Employment Development Dept. (EDD). Those employers who were directly affected by the Kincade and Tick fires, which began on Oct. 23, may request up to a 60-day extension of time from the EDD to file their state payroll reports and deposit payroll taxes without penalty or interest. To get an extension, a written request from the employer must be received within 60 days from the original delinquent date of the payment or return. Please contact your Linkenheimer CPA with questions or for more info: https://bit.ly/331PygJ

Small Businesses: Stay Clear of a Severe Payroll Tax Penalty

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One of the most laborious tasks for small businesses is managing payroll. But it’s critical that you not only withhold the right amount of taxes from employees’ paychecks but also that you pay them over to the federal government on time.

If you willfully fail to do so, you could personally be hit with the Trust Fund Recovery Penalty, also known as the 100% penalty. The penalty applies to the Social Security and income taxes required to be withheld by a business from its employees’ wages. Since the taxes are considered property of the government, the employer holds them in “trust” on the government’s behalf until they’re paid over.

The reason the penalty is sometimes called the “100% penalty” is because the person liable for the taxes (called the “responsible person”) can be personally penalized 100% of the taxes due. Accordingly, the amounts the IRS seeks when the penalty is applied are usually substantial, and the IRS is aggressive in enforcing it.

By |November 5th, 2019|business, employer, tax, tax planning|0 Comments

Thinking About Converting from a C Corporation to an S Corporation?

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The right entity choice can make a difference in the tax bill you owe for your business. Although S corporations can provide substantial tax advantages over C corporations in some circumstances, there are plenty of potentially expensive tax problems that you should assess before making the decision to convert from a C corporation to an S corporation.

Here’s a quick rundown of four issues to consider:

LIFO inventories. C corporations that use last-in, first-out (LIFO) inventories must pay tax on the benefits they derived by using LIFO if they convert to S corporations. The tax can be spread over four years. This cost must be weighed against the potential tax gains from converting to S status.

Built-in gains tax. Although S corporations generally aren’t subject to tax, those that were formerly C corporations are taxed on built-in gains (such as appreciated property) that the C corporation has when […]

By |November 5th, 2019|business, tax implications|0 Comments