property tax

California Announces the Property Tax Postponement (PTP) Program

Life buoy and a small house on blue sea background. 3d illustration

The California State Controller has announced it is taking applications from certain homeowners for property tax deferments. It’s called the Property Tax Postponement (PTP) Program. For the 2019-2020 tax year, homeowners who are seniors or blind, or have a disability, and who meet income, equity and other requirements, can postpone payment of property taxes on their primary residence. Manufactured homes are now also eligible. Funding is limited, and applications will be processed in the order received, beginning Oct. 1. Participants must reapply each year and prove they are still eligible. If you have questions, please contact your Linkenheimer CPA. For details of this new program, call (800) 952-5661 or visit the Controller’s website: https://bit.ly/2mrYGLp

By |October 2nd, 2019|property tax|0 Comments

Thinking About Moving to Another State in Retirement? Don’t Forget About Taxes

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When you retire, you may consider moving to another state — say, for the weather or to be closer to your loved ones. Don’t forget to factor state and local taxes into the equation. Establishing residency for state tax purposes may be more complicated than it initially appears to be.

Identify all applicable taxes

It may seem like a no-brainer to simply move to a state with no personal income tax. But, to make a good decision, you must consider all taxes that can potentially apply to a state resident. In addition to income taxes, these may include property taxes, sales taxes and estate taxes.

If the states you’re considering have an income tax, look at what types of income they tax. Some states, for example, don’t tax wages but do tax interest and dividends. And some states offer tax breaks for pension payments, retirement plan distributions and Social Security payments.

Watch out for state estate tax

The federal estate tax currently doesn’t apply to many people. For 2019, the federal estate tax exemption is $11.4 million ($22.8 million for a married couple). But some states levy estate tax with a much lower exemption and […]

By |June 6th, 2019|property tax, retirement, sales tax, tax planning, taxes|0 Comments

Does Prepaying Property Taxes Make Sense Anymore?

Prepaying property taxes related to the current year but due the following year has long been one of the most popular and effective year-end tax-planning strategies. But does it still make sense in 2018?

The answer, for some people, is yes — accelerating this expense will increase their itemized deductions, reducing their tax bills. But for many, particularly those in high-tax states, changes made by the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (TCJA) eliminate the benefits.

What’s changed?

The TCJA made two changes that affect the viability of this strategy. First, it nearly doubled the standard deduction to $24,000 for married couples filing jointly, $18,000 for heads of household, and $12,000 for singles and married couples filing separately, so fewer taxpayers will itemize. Second, it placed a $10,000 cap on state and local tax (SALT) deductions, including property taxes plus income or sales taxes.

For property tax prepayment to make sense, two things must happen:

  1. You must itemize (that is, your itemized deductions must exceed the standard deduction), and
  2. Your other SALT expenses for the year must be less than $10,000.

If you don’t itemize, or you’ve already used up your $10,000 limit (on income or sales taxes or on previous property […]

By |December 7th, 2018|New Tax Laws, property tax|0 Comments

Linkenheimer’s Carli Ortiz on KSRO

Carli

Linkenheimer’s Carli Ortiz will be on the radio today at noon on KSRO, discussing tax reform as it relates to real estate, both personal residences and business/ rental properties. Please tune into On Air with George Adair on KSRO 1350AM/103.5 FM or stream it live at www.ksro.com.

By |July 11th, 2018|property tax, tax|0 Comments

Reminder: Property Tax Relief Available for Those Impacted by Fires

If your property has been damaged by the recent fires, mudslides, erosion, and flash flooding you may be eligible for property tax relief. In many cases, the damaged property can be reappraised in its current condition, with some taxes refunded to the property owner. Once rebuilt, the property’s pre-damaged value will be restored.

To qualify for property tax relief, you must file a claim with your county assessors’ office within 12 months from the date of damage or destruction. The loss estimate must be at least $10,000 of current market value to qualify.

Owners of eligible property may also apply for deferral of the next property tax installment on the regular secured roll or tax payments on the supplemental roll, without penalties or interest. The disaster must be the result of a Governor-proclaimed state of emergency. When a timely claim for deferral is filed, the next property tax installment payment is deferred without penalty or interest until the county assessor has reassessed the property and a corrected tax bill has been sent to the property owner.
For further information on property tax disaster relief, please see the new Disaster Relief website with helpful […]

By |February 1st, 2018|disaster, Fire Relief Info, property tax|0 Comments

State and Local Tax Deduction Limited

Under pre-Act law, taxpayers could deduct from their taxable income as an itemized deduction several types of taxes paid at the state and local level, including real and personal property taxes, income taxes, and/or sales taxes.

New law. For tax years beginning after Dec. 31, 2017 and before Jan. 1, 2026, subject to the exception described below, State, local, and foreign property taxes, and State and local sales taxes, are deductible only when paid or accrued in carrying on a trade or business or an activity described in Code Sec. 212 (generally, for the production of income). State and local income, war profits, and excess profits are not allowable as a deduction.

However, a taxpayer may claim an itemized deduction of up to $10,000 ($5,000 for a married taxpayer filing a separate return) for the aggregate of (i) State and local property taxes not paid or accrued in carrying on a trade or business or activity described in Code Sec. 212; and (ii) State and local income, war profits, and excess profits taxes (or sales taxes in lieu of income, etc. taxes) paid or accrued in the tax year. Foreign real property taxes may not be deducted. (Code Sec. 164(b)(6), as amended by Act Sec. […]

By |January 9th, 2018|CA tax, income tax, New Tax Laws, property tax, state income|0 Comments

Property Taxes Due February 1st

If you are a property owner, the 2nd installment of your property taxes are due Sunday, February 1st.

Annual property tax bills are mailed in early October of each year. The bill is payable in two installments.

The 1st installment is due on November 1 and is delinquent if the payment is not received by 5:00 p.m. or postmarked by December 10. A 10% penalty is assessed for delinquent payments.

The 2nd installment is due on February 1 and is delinquent if the payment is not received by 5:00 p.m. or postmarked by April 10, a 10% penalty and $10.00 cost fee are assessed.

If December 10 or April 10 falls on a Saturday, Sunday, or a legal holiday, the delinquency date is the next business day.

Both installments can be paid at the same time. If you choose to pay both installments in one payment, please include the first and second installment stubs with your payment.

Payment Deadline Summary

Installment             Due Date            Delinquency Date*            Penalty, if delinquent

1st                   November 1         […]

By |January 29th, 2015|property tax|0 Comments

Property Taxes… According to the Local Assessors Office

After a phone call to the local tax collectors office, we were told the following:

“Unsecured property taxes are currently being printed and in the process of being sent out.  You should start receiving them this week or next week.  They now have an extended deadline of being due in October.  You can however, go online and pay your unsecured property taxes online at anytime.”

Just thought we’d give you a heads up. 

By |August 21st, 2012|assessor, CPA, Linkenheimer, property tax, Santa Rosa|0 Comments