tax planning

An FLP Can Save Tax in a Family Business Succession

One of the biggest concerns for family business owners is succession planning — transferring ownership and control of the company to the next generation. Often, the best time tax-wise to start transferring ownership is long before the owner is ready to give up control of the business.

A family limited partnership (FLP) can help owners enjoy the tax benefits of gradually transferring ownership yet allow them to retain control of the business.

How it works

To establish an FLP, you transfer your ownership interests to a partnership in exchange for both general and limited partnership interests. You then transfer limited partnership interests to your children.

You retain the general partnership interest, which may be as little as 1% of the assets. But as general partner, you can still run day-to-day operations and make business decisions.

Tax benefits

As you transfer the FLP […]

3 Traditional Mid-Year Tax Planning Strategies for Individuals that Hold Up Post-TCJA

With its many changes to individual tax rates, brackets and breaks, the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (TCJA) means taxpayers need to revisit their tax planning strategies. Certain strategies that were once tried-and-true will no longer save or defer tax. But there are some that will hold up for many taxpayers. And they’ll be more effective if you begin implementing them this summer, rather than waiting until year end. Take a look at these three ideas, and contact us to discuss what midyear strategies make sense for you.

  1. Look at your bracket

Under the TCJA, the top income tax rate is now 37% (down from 39.6%) for taxpayers with taxable income over $500,000 (single and head-of-household filers) or $600,000 (married couples filing jointly). These thresholds are higher than for the top rate in 2017 ($418,400, $444,550 and $470,700, respectively). So the top rate might be less of a concern.

However, singles and heads of households in the middle and upper brackets could be pushed into a higher tax bracket much more quickly this year. For example, for 2017 the threshold for the 33% tax bracket was $191,650 for singles and $212,500 for heads of households. […]

New Individual, Estate and Trust Rate Schedules

With the new tax law changes, we will be posting a series of of updates outlining all the changes that will take place. If you have any questions, please contact your Linkenheimer CPA.

FOR MARRIED INDIVIDUALS FILING JOINT RETURNS AND SURVIVING SPOUSES:

If taxable income is: The tax is:

Not over $19,050 10% of taxable income

Over $19,050 but not over $77,400 $1,905 plus 12% of the excess over $19,050

Over $77,400 but not over $165,000 $8,907 plus 22% of the excess over $77,400

Over $165,000 but not over $315,000 $28,179 plus 24% of the excess over $165,000

Over $315,000 but not over $400,000 $64,179 plus 32% of the excess over $315,000

Over $400,000 but not over $600,000 $91,379 plus 35% of the excess over $400,000

Over $600,000 $161,379 plus 37% of the excess over $600,000

FOR SINGLE INDIVIDUALS (OTHER THAN HEADS OF HOUSEHOLDS AND SURVIVING SPOUSES):

If taxable income is: The tax is:

Not over $9,525 10% of taxable income

Over $9,525 but not over $38,700 $952.50 plus 12% of the excess over $9,525

Over $38,700 but not over $82,500 $4,453.50 plus 22% of the excess over $38,700

Over $82,500 but not over $157,500 $14,089.50 plus 24% of the excess over $82,500

Over $157,500 but not over $200,000 $32,089.50 […]

By |January 5th, 2018|income tax, New Tax Laws, tax, tax planning|0 Comments

Trump’s 2017 Tax Reform Unveiled

The White House  issued President Trump’s goals and key features for tax reform, including cut corporate tax rates, flattened individual marginal income tax brackets, and repeal of the estate and alternative minimum taxes. He outlined these proposals in a one page bulletin which you can see below. The individual and business tax reform highlights include the following:

Proposed individual tax provisions:

  • Down from the current seven tax rates to three- 10%, 25% and a top rate of 35% (down from 39.6%).
  • Elimination of the Estate Tax.
  • Elimination of itemized deductions outside of mortgage interest and charitable contributions.
  • Repeal of the Alternative Minimum Tax (AMT).
  • Repeal of the 3.8% tax on net investment income.
  • Doubling of the standard deduction for married couples and individuals.
  • Tax relief for families and dependent care expenses.

Proposed business tax provisions:

  • Decreasing the top corporate tax rate to 15% (current top tax rate is 35%).
  • The 15% tax rate would apply to business income of pass-through entities such as partnerships, S corporations and limited liability companies.
  • A one time tax on business profits (at an unspecified tax rate) in foreign countries repatriated to the United States.
  • Introduction of a territorial tax system in place of the current worldwide tax regime.

Below is the one page bulletin released from the White House. […]

By |May 4th, 2017|tax, tax planning|0 Comments

In Honor of National Philanthropic Day (November 15th 2014)…

Have you considered charitable giving as a tax planning strategy for 2014?

It’s that time of year again! As we enter into the holiday season (which based on the local Target store is now officially the day after Halloween) of festive parties, family gatherings, and of course,  gift giving, it creates a natural opportunity for those who are charitably inclined to consider yearend charitable contributions.  In addition to the philanthropic aspect of charitable giving, it also can be used as an effective  estate and yearend tax planning tool.

Most American households make their charitable gifts in cash, with the corresponding tax deduction allowed as an itemized deduction on their individual tax returns. In most instances, taxpayers may deduct up to 50% of their adjusted gross income (AGI) for cash gifts made to public charities.  For gifts that exceed the 50% threshold, the contribution deduction is carried forward for a five year period.

For those who plan on incorporating charitable giving into their estate and tax planning strategies, gifting of highly appreciated property (stock, mutual funds, real estate) can be an extremely valuable tool that is often overlooked. This tax planning strategy is derived from the general idea […]

By |November 6th, 2014|charity, strategy, tax planning|0 Comments

Year-end tax planning with checklists and tips

Year-end tax planning could be especially productive this year because timely action could nail down a host of tax breaks that won’t be around next year unless Congress acts to extend them, which, at the present time, looks doubtful. These include, for individuals: the option to deduct state and local sales and use taxes instead of state and local income taxes; the above-the-line deduction for qualified higher education expenses; and tax-free distributions by those age 70-1/2 or older from IRAs for charitable purposes. For businesses, tax breaks that are available through the end of this year but won’t be around next year unless Congress acts include: 50% bonus first-year depreciation for most new machinery, equipment and software; an extraordinarily high $500,000 expensing limitation; the research tax credit; and the 15-year write-off for qualified leasehold improvements, qualified restaurant buildings and improvements and qualified retail improvements.

High-income-earners have other factors to keep in mind when mapping out year-end plans. For the first time, they have to take into account the 3.8% tax surtax on unearned income and the additional 0.9% Medicare (hospital insurance, or HI) tax that applies to individuals receiving wages with respect to employment in excess of $200,000 ($250,000 for […]

Part 3 of 3: Fiscal Cliff and Tax Planning for Small Businesses

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Part 2 of 3: Fiscal Cliff and Year-End Tax Planning for Individuals

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