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A Review of Significant TCJA Provisions Impacting Individual Taxpayers

Now that 2019 has begun, there isn’t too much you can do to reduce your 2018 income tax liability. But it’s smart to begin preparing for filing your 2018 return. Because the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (TCJA), which was signed into law at the end of 2017, likely will have a major impact on your 2018 taxes, it’s a good time to review the most significant provisions impacting individual taxpayers.

Rates and exemptions

Generally, taxpayers will be subject to lower tax rates for 2018. But a couple of rates stay the same, and changes to some of the brackets for certain types of filers (individuals and heads of households) could cause them to be subject to higher rates. Some exemptions are eliminated, while others increase. Here are some of the specific changes:

  • Drops of individual income tax rates ranging from 0 to 4 percentage points (depending on the bracket) to 10%, 12%, 22%, 24%, 32%, 35% and 37%
  • Elimination of personal and dependent exemptions
  • AMT exemption increase, to $109,400 for joint filers, $70,300 for singles and heads of households, and $54,700 for separate filers for 2018
  • Approximate doubling of the gift and estate tax exemption, to $11.18 million for […]
By |January 3rd, 2019|credit, deduction, deductions, New Tax Laws, tax rate|0 Comments

Research Credit Available to Some Businesses for the First Time

The Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (TCJA) didn’t change the federal tax credit for “increasing research activities,” but several TCJA provisions have an indirect impact on the credit. As a result, the research credit may be available to some businesses for the first time.

AMT reform

Previously, corporations subject to alternative minimum tax (AMT) couldn’t offset the research credit against their AMT liability, which erased the benefits of the credit (although they could carry unused research credits forward for up to 20 years and use them in non-AMT years). By eliminating corporate AMT for tax years beginning after 2017, the TCJA removed this obstacle.

Now that the corporate AMT is gone, unused research credits from prior tax years can be offset against a corporation’s regular tax liability and may even generate a refund (subject to certain restrictions). So it’s a good idea for corporations to review their research activities in recent years and amend prior returns if necessary to ensure they claim all […]

By |November 9th, 2018|business, credit, New Tax Laws, research credit|0 Comments

What Businesses Need to Know About the Tax Treatment of Bitcoin and Other Virtual Currencies

Over the last several years, virtual currency has become increasingly popular. Bitcoin is the most widely recognized form of virtual currency, also commonly referred to as digital, electronic or crypto currency.

While most smaller businesses aren’t yet accepting bitcoin or other virtual currency payments from their customers, more and more larger businesses are. And the trend may trickle down to smaller businesses. Businesses also can pay employees or independent contractors with virtual currency. But what are the tax consequences of these transactions?

Bitcoin 101

Bitcoin has an equivalent value in real currency and can be digitally traded between users. It also can be purchased with real currencies or exchanged for real currencies. Bitcoin is most commonly obtained through virtual currency ATMs or online exchanges.

Goods or services can be paid for using “bitcoin wallet” software. When a purchase is made, the software digitally posts the transaction to a global public ledger. This prevents the same unit of virtual currency from being used multiple times.

Tax impact

Questions about the tax impact of virtual currency abound. And the IRS has yet to offer much guidance.

The IRS did establish in a 2014 ruling that bitcoin and other convertible virtual currency should be […]

By |June 5th, 2018|credit, irs, payments, tax, tax implications|0 Comments

College Tax Credit Reminder

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The IRS recently reminded taxpayers that back-to-school time is a good time to see if they qualify for education-related tax credits. The American Opportunity Credit (AOC) and Lifetime Learning Credit (LLC) are available to taxpayers who pay qualifying expenses for eligible students. The maximum AOC is $2,500 per student, 40% refundable, and available for the first four years of postsecondary education. The LLC is limited to $2,000 per tax return, nonrefundable, and available to both graduate and undergraduate students. Only one credit can be claimed for a particular student in a tax year.

By |October 6th, 2014|college tax credit, credit, tax credit|0 Comments

Top 5 Year-End Corporate Tax Planning Tips

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2012 Year-End Tax Planning Takes a Different Direction

Each year we meet with our clients to review their projected taxes for the year and see what actions can be taken to minimize their tax liability.  The usual actions are to defer income to the following year, accelerate deductions into the current year, and take advantage of tax credits. This year, the year-end tax planning process is turning in a different direction.  
With the looming expiration of many tax deductions and increase in tax rates that begin in 2013, some clients are considering taking a reverse course by accelerating income and deferring deductions as a plan to minimize taxes. In addition to changes in the income tax code, unless Congress passes new legislation, the estate taxes are dramatically changing in 2013. Until December 31, 2012 each person can make gifts during their lifetime of up to $5,120,000 without incurring a gift tax. Starting in 2013, unless new legislation is passed, the lifetime exemption drops back to $1,000,000. This exemption is in addition to the annual exemption on gifts of $13,000 or less.  
As year-end is quickly approaching, now is the time to review […]