We’re Hiring- Staff Accountant and Controller!

LK-119 cropped

Interested in joining a fun, vibrant work culture that puts people first? Want to make an impact on the community, work together as a team to solve client’s financial needs, drink copious amounts of really good, local, organic coffee? Looking to join a company that has won Best Place to Work for 10 years in a row?

We are always looking to add the right folks to our team. If you are interested in a career in accounting, have your CPA license, enjoy a team approach, we might be your match made in heaven.

It’s not all work here either. We serve the community together, build bonds on our annual team retreats and celebrate our successes with our families on annual, company wide vacations. Recent firm trips have included Spain, Croatia, Disneyland and Alaska. We don’t strive for work life balance, we live it and champion for it. We appreciate everyone’s contributions- big or small. Sound enticing? Interested in working at a not-so-typical CPA firm? Let us know if our creative accounting culture might be right for you.

For more info on the open positions we have, visit www.linkcpa.com/join-our-team/

By |May 22nd, 2019|best place to work, cpa firm, employer, firm|0 Comments

Consider a Roth 401(k) Plan — And Make Sure Employees Use It

05_13_19_1075439318_SBTB_560x292

Roth 401(k) accounts have been around for 13 years now. Studies show that more employers are offering them each year. A recent study by the Plan Sponsor Council of America (PSCA) found that Roth 401(k)s are now available at 70% of employer plans, up from 55.6% of plans in 2016.

However, despite the prevalence of employers offering Roth 401(k)s, most employees aren’t choosing to contribute to them. The PSCA found that only 20% of participants who have access to a Roth 401(k) made contributions to one in 2017. Perhaps it’s because they don’t understand them.

If you offer a Roth 401(k) or you’re considering one, educate your employees about the accounts to boost participation.

A 401(k) with a twist

As the name implies, these plans are a hybrid — taking some characteristics from Roth IRAs and some from employer-sponsored 401(k)s.

An employer with a 401(k), 403(b) or governmental 457(b) plan can offer designated Roth 401(k) accounts.

As with traditional 401(k)s, eligible employees can elect to defer part of their salaries to Roth 401(k)s, subject to annual limits. The employer may choose to provide matching contributions. For 2019, a participating employee can contribute up to $19,000 ($25,000 if […]

By |May 22nd, 2019|401k, deduction, employer, ira, roth ira|0 Comments

Employee vs. Independent Contractor: How Should You Handle Worker Classification?

04_29_19_GettyImages-skd183397sdc_SBTB_560x292

Many employers prefer to classify workers as independent contractors to lower costs, even if it means having less control over a worker’s day-to-day activities. But the government is on the lookout for businesses that classify workers as independent contractors simply to reduce taxes or avoid their employee benefit obligations.

Why it matters

When your business classifies a worker as an employee, you generally must withhold federal income tax and the employee’s share of Social Security and Medicare taxes from his or her wages. Your business must then pay the employer’s share of these taxes, pay federal unemployment tax, file federal payroll tax returns and follow other burdensome IRS and U.S. Department of Labor rules.

You may also have to pay state and local unemployment and workers’ compensation taxes and comply with more rules. Dealing with all this can cost a bundle each year.

On the other hand, with independent contractor status, you don’t […]

By |May 2nd, 2019|employer, irs, tax|0 Comments

Are you a California Employer Who Must File State Copies of W2s and 1099s?

Are you a California employer who must file state copies of W2s and 1099s? Returns that are paper-filed with the IRS will be forwarded to the CA Franchise Tax Board (FTB), so there’s no need for you to also file with the FTB. Generally, the IRS and FTB have the same filing requirements. If you have 250 or more returns, electronic filing with the FTB is required. The e-filing due date is 3/31/19. If you use the IRS Combined Federal/State Filing Program, only one filing is necessary. The IRS will forward original or corrected data to the FTB. If you have questions about filing, please contact your Linkenheimer CPA. 

By |March 20th, 2019|1099, business, CA tax, california, employer, ftb, w2|0 Comments

California Grants Disaster Relief to Certain Employers

IMG_1070

California grants disaster relief to certain employers. The CA Employment Development Dept. is giving affected employers extra time to file state payroll reports and to deposit state payroll taxes without penalty or interest. This applies to employers in Amador, Glenn, Lake, Mendocino and Sonoma Counties who were directly affected by storms that began on 2/25/19. These employers may request a 60-day extension of time to accomplish these tasks. Requests must be received within 60 days of the original payment or return due dates. If you have questions about this or other filing deadlines, please contact your Linkenheimer CPA. For details: https://bit.ly/2LyrD38

By |March 13th, 2019|business, california, employer, extension|0 Comments

Is There Still Time to Pay 2018 Bonuses and Deduct Them On Your 2018 Return?

There aren’t too many things businesses can do after a year ends to reduce tax liability for that year. However, you might be able to pay employee bonuses for 2018 in 2019 and still deduct them on your 2018 tax return. In certain circumstances, businesses can deduct bonuses employees have earned during a tax year if the bonuses are paid within 2½ months after the end of that year (by March 15 for a calendar-year company).

Basic requirements

First, only accrual-basis taxpayers can take advantage of the 2½ month rule. Cash-basis taxpayers must deduct bonuses in the year they’re paid, regardless of when they’re earned.

Second, even for accrual-basis taxpayers, the 2½ month rule isn’t automatic. The bonuses can be deducted on the tax return for the year they’re earned only if the business’s bonus liability was fixed by the end of the year.

Passing the test

For accrual-basis taxpayers, a liability (such as a bonus) is deductible when it is incurred. To determine this, the IRS applies the “all-events test.” Under this test, a liability is incurred when:

  • All events have occurred that establish the taxpayer’s liability,
  • The amount of the liability can be determined with reasonable accuracy, and
  • Economic performance […]
By |January 8th, 2019|bonus, deduction, employer, tax, tax deadlines|0 Comments

Tax-Free Fringe Benefits Help Small Businesses and Their Employees

In today’s tightening job market, to attract and retain the best employees, small businesses need to offer not only competitive pay, but also appealing fringe benefits. Benefits that are tax-free are especially attractive to employees. Let’s take a quick look at some popular options.

Insurance

Businesses can provide their employees with various types of insurance on a tax-free basis. Here are some of the most common:

Health insurance. If you maintain a health care plan for employees, coverage under the plan isn’t taxable to them. Employee contributions are excluded from income if pretax coverage is elected under a cafeteria plan. Otherwise, such amounts are included in their wages, but may be deductible on a limited basis as an itemized deduction.

Disability insurance. Your premium payments aren’t included in employees’ income, nor are your contributions to a trust providing disability benefits. Employees’ premium payments (or […]

Be Sure Your Employee Travel Expense Reimbursements Will Pass Muster with the IRS

Does your business reimburse employees’ work-related travel expenses? If you do, you know that it can help you attract and retain employees. If you don’t, you might want to start, because changes under the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (TCJA) make such reimbursements even more attractive to employees. Travel reimbursements also come with tax benefits, but only if you follow a method that passes muster with the IRS.

The TCJA’s impact

Before the TCJA, unreimbursed work-related travel expenses generally were deductible on an employee’s individual tax return (subject to a 50% limit for meals and entertainment) as a miscellaneous itemized deduction. However, many employees weren’t able to benefit from the deduction because either they didn’t itemize deductions or they didn’t have enough miscellaneous itemized expenses to exceed the 2% of adjusted gross income (AGI) floor that applied.

For 2018 through 2025, the TCJA suspends miscellaneous itemized deductions subject to the 2% of AGI floor. That means even employees who itemize deductions and have enough expenses that they would exceed the floor won’t be able to enjoy a tax deduction for business travel. Therefore, business travel expense reimbursements are now more important to employees.

The potential tax benefits

Your business […]

By |October 2nd, 2018|employer, expensing, irs, New Tax Laws|0 Comments

Contemplating Compensation Increases and Pay for Performance

As a business grows, one of many challenges it faces is identifying a competitive yet manageable compensation structure. After all, offer too little and you likely won’t have much success in hiring. Offer too much and you may compromise cash flow and profitability.

But the challenge doesn’t end there. Once you have a feasible compensation structure in place, your organization must then set its course for determining the best way for employees to progress through it. And this is when you must contemplate the nature and efficacy of linking pay to performance.

Issues in play

Some observers believe that companies shouldn’t use compensation to motivate employees because workers might stop focusing on quality of work and start focusing on money. Additionally, employees may feel that the merit — or “pay-for-performance” — model pits staff members against each other for the highest raises.

Thus, some businesses give uniform pay adjustments to everyone. In doing so, these companies hope to eliminate competition and ensure that all employees are working toward the same goal. But, if everyone gets the same raise, is there any motivation for employees to continually improve?

2 critical factors

Many businesses don’t think so and do use additional money […]

By |August 20th, 2018|business, employee evaluations, employer|0 Comments

How to Avoid Getting Hit with Payroll Tax Penalties

For small businesses, managing payroll can be one of the most arduous tasks. Adding to the burden earlier this year was adjusting income tax withholding based on the new tables issued by the IRS. (Those tables account for changes under the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act.) But it’s crucial not only to withhold the appropriate taxes — including both income tax and employment taxes — but also to remit them on time to the federal government.

If you don’t, you, personally, could face harsh penalties. This is true even if your business is an entity that normally shields owners from personal liability, such as a corporation or limited liability company.

The 100% penalty

Employers must withhold federal income and employment taxes (such as Social Security) as well as applicable state and local taxes on wages paid to their employees. The federal taxes must then be remitted to the federal government according to a deposit schedule.

If a business makes payments late, there are escalating penalties. And if it fails to make them, the Trust Fund Recovery Penalty could apply. Under this penalty, also known as the 100% penalty, the IRS can assess the entire unpaid amount against a […]

By |July 9th, 2018|employer, income tax, tax|0 Comments