covid19

Student Loan Interest: Can You Deduct It On Your Tax Return?

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The economic impact of the novel coronavirus (COVID-19) is unprecedented and many taxpayers with student loans have been hard hit.

The Coronavirus Aid, Relief and Economic Security (CARES) Act contains some assistance to borrowers with federal student loans. Notably, federal loans were automatically placed in an administrative forbearance, which allows borrowers to temporarily stop making monthly payments. This payment suspension is scheduled to last until September 30, 2020.

Tax deduction rules

Despite the suspension, borrowers can still make payments if they choose. And borrowers in good standing made payments earlier in the year and will likely make them later in 2020. So can you deduct the student loan interest on your tax return?

The answer is yes, depending on your income and subject to certain limits. The maximum amount of student loan interest you can deduct each year is $2,500. The deduction is phased out if your adjusted gross income (AGI) exceeds certain […]

California Tax Updates for May 21st

FAQ

Update 1:

Do you still have questions about how California helps those affected by the novel coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic? The CA Franchise Tax Board (FTB) has just updated its frequently asked questions (FAQs) by adding a section on the individual status letter (also known as a veteran affairs status letter). These letters help individuals get student loans or Veteran Affairs financing. They also show third parties such as employers that the letter holder has no outstanding CA income tax obligations. If you have questions, please contact your Linkenheimer CPA. You can also learn who may obtain an individual status letter and how, and get answers to a wide variety of questions by visiting the FTB here: https://bit.ly/2AuMxwb 

Update 2:

Are you part of the California gig economy? The CA Franchise Tax Board (FTB) has updated its gig economy webpage, which it created to provide information to those who use platforms such as Uber, Lyft, Airbnb and […]

By |May 21st, 2020|ca, CA tax, california, ftb|0 Comments

California Tax Updates for May 7th

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Update 1:

Are you selling goods in California? Now that so many people are looking for alternate ways to make an income due to the novel coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic, selling goods from home is attracting a lot of people. Depending on the details, you may need a seller’s permit. The CA Dept. of Tax and Fee Administration (CDFTA) has issued an updated publication entitled “Do You Need a CA Seller’s Permit?” Generally, if you make three or more sales in a 12-month period, you are required to have a seller’s permit, even if the sales were made through internet auctions houses or websites or offered through online classified ads. Here’s more from the CDFTA: https://bit.ly/353Cd9v

Update 2:

San Francisco will require public health emergency leave for some employees during the novel coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic. The federal Families First Coronavirus Response Act provides sick leave to employees who are unable to work or telework due to […]

By |May 7th, 2020|business, employer|0 Comments

California Tax Updates for April 22

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Post 1:

The California Franchise Tax Board (FTB) has posted frequently asked questions (FAQs), related to tax relief due to the novel coronavirus (COVID-19). The list addresses topics such as: information returns, extensions to file; the postponement periods of March 12 through July 15, 2020; statutes of limitations, and more. Even more recent additions to FAQ topics are: nonresidential nonwage withholding and real estate withholding. Check the latest FAQ here: https://bit.ly/3e2q9cA or contact us with questions.

Post 2:

An extension of time has been issued for California taxpayers to accomplish certain tasks, from the CA Franchise Tax Board (FTB), due to the novel coronavirus (COVID-19). They include claiming a refund, filing a protest of a notice of proposed assessment (NPA) with the FTB, and filing an appeal or petition for a rehearing with the Office of Tax Appeals. The extension also gives the FTB extra […]

By |April 22nd, 2020|california, ftb, irs, New Tax Laws|0 Comments

Answers To Questions You May Have About Economic Impact Payments

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Millions of eligible Americans have already received their Economic Impact Payments (EIPs) via direct deposit or paper checks, according to the IRS. Others are still waiting. The payments are part of the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act. Here are some answers to questions you may have about EIPs.

Who’s eligible to get an EIP?

Eligible taxpayers who filed their 2018 or 2019 returns and chose direct deposit of their refunds automatically receive an Economic Impact Payment. You must be a U.S. citizen or U.S. resident alien and you can’t be claimed as a dependent on someone else’s tax return. In general, you must also have a valid Social Security number and have adjusted gross income (AGI) under a certain threshold.

The IRS also says that automatic payments will go to people receiving Social Security retirement or disability benefits and Railroad Retirement benefits.

How much are the payments?

EIPs can be up to $1,200 for individuals, or $2,400 for married couples, plus $500 for each qualifying child.

How much income must I have to receive a payment?

You don’t need to have any income to receive a payment. But for higher income people, the payments […]

By |April 21st, 2020|irs, New Tax Laws|0 Comments

New COVID-19 Law Makes Favorable Changes To “Qualified Improvement Property”

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The law providing relief due to the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic contains a beneficial change in the tax rules for many improvements to interior parts of nonresidential buildings. This is referred to as qualified improvement property (QIP). You may recall that under the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (TCJA), any QIP placed in service after December 31, 2017 wasn’t considered to be eligible for 100% bonus depreciation. Therefore, the cost of QIP had to be deducted over a 39-year period rather than entirely in the year the QIP was placed in service. This was due to an inadvertent drafting mistake made by Congress.

But the error is now fixed. The Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act was signed into law on March 27, 2020. It now allows most businesses to claim 100% bonus depreciation for QIP, as long as certain other requirements are met. What’s also helpful is that the correction is retroactive and it goes back to apply to any QIP placed in service after December 31, 2017. Unfortunately, improvements related […]

By |April 20th, 2020|business, irs, New Tax Laws, qualified small business|0 Comments

What Are The Key Distinctions Between Layoffs And Furloughs?

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As businesses across the country grapple with the economic fallout from the novel coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic, many must decide whether to downsize their workforces to lower payroll costs and stabilize cash flow. If your company is contemplating such a move, you’ll likely want to consider the choice within the choice: that is, should you lay off workers or furlough them?

Basic difference

The basic difference between the two is simple. Layoffs are the ostensibly permanent termination of employees from their positions, though you can rehire some of these individuals when business improves. Meanwhile, a furlough is a mandatory or voluntary suspension from work without pay for a specified period.

In most states, furloughed workers are still considered employees and, therefore, don’t receive a “final” paycheck. Check with an employment or labor attorney, however, to make sure your state’s furlough laws don’t trigger final pay requirements.

Employee benefits are another issue to explore. Reach […]

By |April 15th, 2020|business, New Tax Laws, tax deadlines, tax implications|0 Comments

Relief From Not Making Employment Tax Deposits Due To COVID-19 Tax Credits

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The IRS has issued guidance providing relief from failure to make employment tax deposits for employers that are entitled to the refundable tax credits provided under two laws passed in response to the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic. The two laws are the Families First Coronavirus Response Act, which was signed on March 18, 2020, and the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act (CARES) Act, which was signed on March 27, 2020.

Employment tax penalty basics

The tax code imposes a penalty for any failure to deposit amounts as required on the date prescribed, unless such failure is due to reasonable cause rather than willful neglect.

An employer’s failure to deposit certain federal employment taxes, including deposits of withheld income taxes and taxes under the Federal Insurance Contributions Act (FICA) is generally subject to a penalty.

COVID-19 relief credits

Employers paying qualified sick leave wages and qualified family leave wages required by the Families First Act, as well as qualified health plan expenses allocable to qualified leave wages, are eligible for refundable tax credits under the Families First Act.

Specifically, provisions of the Families First Act provide a refundable tax credit against an employer’s share of the Social […]

IRS Provides Guidance Under The CARES Act To Taxpayers With Net Operating Losses

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The Internal Revenue Service today issued guidance providing tax relief under the CARES Act for taxpayers with net operating losses. Recently the IRS issued tax relief for partnerships filing amended returns.

COVID Relief for taxpayers claiming NOLs
Revenue Procedure 2020-24 provides guidance to taxpayers with net operating losses that are carried back under the CARES Act by providing procedures for:

  • waiving the carryback period in the case of a net operating loss arising in a taxable year beginning after Dec. 31, 2017, and before Jan. 1, 2021,
  • disregarding certain amounts of foreign income subject to transition tax that would normally have been included as income during the five-year carryback period, and
  • waiving a carryback period, reducing a carryback period, or revoking an election to waive a carryback period for a taxable year that began before Jan. 1, 2018, and ended after Dec. 31, 2017.

Six month extension of time for filing NOL forms
In Notice 2020-26, the IRS grants a six-month extension of time to file Form 1045 or Form 1139, as applicable, with respect to the carryback of a net operating loss that arose in any taxable year that began during calendar year 2018 and […]

Penalties For Late Property Tax Payments In California Will Be Waived

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Due to the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic, penalties and other charges for late property tax payments in California will be waived. The CA Association of County Treasurers and Tax Collectors (CACTTC) has issued a statement regarding the April 10 tax collection deadline for the second installment of property tax for the 2019-2020 fiscal year. While the CACTTC cannot change the deadline, it can provide relief from the penalties, cost or other charges resulting from tax delinquency due to reasonable cause related to the crisis. The statement also encourages taxpayers to pay electronically. If you have questions, please reach out to your Linkenheimer CPA for help. See answers to frequently asked questions from the CACTTC here: https://bit.ly/3aysXvT 

By |April 8th, 2020|property tax|0 Comments