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Are You Engaged in Internet Sales in California?

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Are you engaged in Internet sales in California? In light of changes to sales and use tax that became effective in April, some retailers may not be certain if they must collect and pay over sales and use tax based on aspects of their businesses. The CA Dept. of Tax and Fee Administration has updated Publication 109 (Internet Sales) to add clarity on many issues. One key change is the addition of details that defines what “engaged in business” in CA means and doesn’t mean. For example, “Offering merchandise for sale over the phone, by mail order, or online will generally not, by itself, cause a retailer to be engaged in business in CA.” Go to https://bit.ly/2OClJka and scroll down. If you have questions or would like more info, please contact your Linkenheimer CPA. 

By |August 22nd, 2019|sales tax|0 Comments

The IRS is Targeting Business Transactions in Bitcoin and Other Virtual Currencies

Cryptocurrency and blockchain. Platform creation of digital currency.

Bitcoin and other forms of virtual currency are gaining popularity. But many businesses, consumers, employees and investors are still confused about how they work and how to report transactions on their federal tax returns. And the IRS just announced that it is targeting virtual currency users in a new “educational letter” campaign.

The nuts and bolts

Unlike cash or credit cards, small businesses generally don’t accept bitcoin payments for routine transactions. However, a growing number of larger retailers — and online businesses — now accept payments. Businesses can also pay employees or independent contractors with virtual currency. The trend is expected to continue, so more small businesses may soon get on board.

Bitcoin has an equivalent value in real currency. It can be digitally traded between users. You can also purchase and exchange bitcoin with real currencies (such as U.S. dollars). The most common ways to obtain bitcoin are through virtual currency ATMs […]

By |August 13th, 2019|business, irs, w2|0 Comments

New Application Period for a Valuable California Business Tax Credit

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Coming up soon is a new application period for a valuable California business tax credit. The CA Governor’s Office of Business and Economic Development has announced that, for fiscal year 2019-2020, a total of $236,808,527 in CA Competes Tax Credits is available.  Learn more about applying here:  https://bit.ly/2nxiNGc.  Applications will be accepted during the following periods: July 29 through August 19, 2019 ($90 million total); January 6 through January 27, 2020 ($75 million total); and March 9 through March 30, 2020 ($71.8 million, plus unallocated amounts from previous periods). This credit is an income or franchise tax credit available to businesses that come, stay or expand in CA. If you have questions or are interested in applying, please contact your Linkenheimer CPA.

By |July 22nd, 2019|business, tax credit|0 Comments

The Minimum Wage is to Rise in Sonoma, California

Increase the Minimum Wage

The minimum wage is to rise in Sonoma, California. The city of Sonoma will gradually increase the hourly minimum wage for both small and large employers. Here’s the schedule of hourly rates for employers with up to 25 workers: $12.50 on Jan. 1, 2020; $14.00 on Jan. 1, 2021; $15.00 on Jan. 1, 2022; and $16.00 on Jan. 1, 2023. For larger employers, the schedule of hourly rates is as follows: $13.50 on Jan. 1, 2020; $15.00 on Jan. 1, 2021; $16.00 on Jan. 1, 2022; and $17.00 in 2023. Beginning Jan. 1, 2024, the minimum wage rate for all employees will increase by 3.5%, or a percentage set by a separate Council of the City of Sonoma resolution (whichever is less). Contact your Linkenheimer CPA with your questions.

By |July 15th, 2019|business, employer|0 Comments

Volunteering for Charity: Do You Get a Tax Break?

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If you’re a volunteer who works for charity, you may be entitled to some tax breaks if you itemize deductions on your tax return. Unfortunately, they may not amount to as much as you think your generosity is worth.

Because donations to charity of cash or property generally are tax deductible for itemizers, it may seem like donations of something more valuable for many people — their time — would also be deductible. However, no tax deduction is allowed for the value of time you spend volunteering or the services you perform for a charitable organization.

It doesn’t matter if the services you provide require significant skills and experience, such as construction, which a charity would have to pay dearly for if it went out and obtained itself. You still don’t get to deduct the value of your time.

However, you potentially can deduct out-of-pocket costs associated with your volunteer work.

The basic […]

By |July 9th, 2019|charity, expensing, New Tax Laws, tax|0 Comments

Bartering: A Taxable Transaction Even if Your Business Exchanges No Cash

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Small businesses may find it beneficial to barter for goods and services instead of paying cash for them. If your business engages in bartering, be aware that the fair market value of goods that you receive in bartering is taxable income. And if you exchange services with another business, the transaction results in taxable income for both parties.

Income is also realized if services are exchanged for property. For example, if a construction firm does work for a retail business in exchange for unsold inventory, it will have income equal to the fair market value of the inventory.

Barter clubs

Many business owners join barter clubs that facilitate barter exchanges. In general, these clubs use a system of “credit units” that are awarded to members who provide goods and services. The credits can be redeemed for goods and services from other members.

Bartering is generally taxable in the year it occurs. But if […]

Consider a Roth 401(k) Plan — And Make Sure Employees Use It

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Roth 401(k) accounts have been around for 13 years now. Studies show that more employers are offering them each year. A recent study by the Plan Sponsor Council of America (PSCA) found that Roth 401(k)s are now available at 70% of employer plans, up from 55.6% of plans in 2016.

However, despite the prevalence of employers offering Roth 401(k)s, most employees aren’t choosing to contribute to them. The PSCA found that only 20% of participants who have access to a Roth 401(k) made contributions to one in 2017. Perhaps it’s because they don’t understand them.

If you offer a Roth 401(k) or you’re considering one, educate your employees about the accounts to boost participation.

A 401(k) with a twist

As the name implies, these plans are a hybrid — taking some characteristics from Roth IRAs and some from employer-sponsored 401(k)s.

An employer with a 401(k), 403(b) or governmental 457(b) plan can offer designated Roth 401(k) accounts.

As with traditional 401(k)s, eligible employees can elect to defer part of their salaries to Roth 401(k)s, subject to annual limits. The employer may choose to provide matching contributions. For 2019, a participating employee can contribute up to $19,000 ($25,000 if […]

By |May 22nd, 2019|401k, deduction, employer, ira, roth ira|0 Comments

Buy vs. Lease: Business Equipment Edition

Life presents us with many choices: paper or plastic, chocolate or vanilla, regular or decaf. For businesses, a common conundrum is buy or lease. You’ve probably faced this decision when considering office space or a location for your company’s production facilities. But the buy vs. lease quandary also comes into play with equipment.

Pride of ownership

Some business owners approach buying equipment like purchasing a car: “It’s mine; I’m committed to it and I’m going to do everything I can to familiarize myself with this asset and keep it in tip-top shape.” Yes, pride of ownership is still a thing.

If this is your philosophy, work to pass along that pride to employees. When you get staff members to buy in to the idea that this is your equipment and the success of the company depends on using and maintaining each asset properly, the business can obtain a great deal of long-term value from assets that are bought […]

By |May 14th, 2019|business, deductions, expensing|0 Comments

Employee vs. Independent Contractor: How Should You Handle Worker Classification?

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Many employers prefer to classify workers as independent contractors to lower costs, even if it means having less control over a worker’s day-to-day activities. But the government is on the lookout for businesses that classify workers as independent contractors simply to reduce taxes or avoid their employee benefit obligations.

Why it matters

When your business classifies a worker as an employee, you generally must withhold federal income tax and the employee’s share of Social Security and Medicare taxes from his or her wages. Your business must then pay the employer’s share of these taxes, pay federal unemployment tax, file federal payroll tax returns and follow other burdensome IRS and U.S. Department of Labor rules.

You may also have to pay state and local unemployment and workers’ compensation taxes and comply with more rules. Dealing with all this can cost a bundle each year.

On the other hand, with independent contractor status, you don’t […]

By |May 2nd, 2019|employer, irs, tax|0 Comments

How Entrepreneurs Must Treat Expenses on Their Tax Returns

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Have you recently started a new business? Or are you contemplating starting one? Launching a new venture is a hectic, exciting time. And as you know, before you even open the doors, you generally have to spend a lot of money. You may have to train workers and pay for rent, utilities, marketing and more.

Entrepreneurs are often unaware that many expenses incurred by start-ups can’t be deducted right away. You should be aware that the way you handle some of your initial expenses can make a large difference in your tax bill.

Key points on how expenses are handled

When starting or planning a new enterprise, keep these factors in mind:

  1. Start-up costs include those incurred or paid while creating an active trade or business — or investigating the creation or acquisition of one.
  2. Under the federal tax code, taxpayers can elect to deduct up to $5,000 of business start-up and $5,000 of organizational costs in the year the business begins. We don’t need to tell you that $5,000 doesn’t go far these days! And the $5,000 deduction is reduced dollar-for-dollar by the amount by which your total start-up or organizational costs exceed $50,000. Any […]
By |April 22nd, 2019|business, deduction, deductions, expensing|0 Comments