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Giving Back During the Holidays at the Redwood Empire Food Bank

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On Tuesday, December 3rd, the team from Linkenheimer, along with significant others and kids, met up after work at the Redwood Empire Food Bank to lend a helping hand. Holiday months are always tough for REFB in terms of finding volunteers, so we were excited to be able to participate and assist a great local non-profit that has been serving Sonoma County for over a decade, providing meals to elderly, children and those in need. Over the course of our two hours there, we formed into teams to put to sort through and box bread and baked goods. In total, we boxed 3, 697 lbs of bread to be sent out in the community. This helps provide over 2,900 meals to be distributed to our neighbors in need. Local charities like these are what makes Sonoma County such a great place to live and do business in and we are proud to support them. So during these busy holiday months, we encourage everyone to take some time and think about how they can give back and help those less fortunate. If everyone does a little, the impact can be huge. Happy Holidays from the Linkenheimer […]

By |December 12th, 2019|Community|0 Comments

FAQs Related to Disaster Recovery and the Fires

Red Sunset Forest Fire Damage

Our CPA’s have compiled a list of 25 frequently asked questions related to fire victims and the recovery process. This document will continue to be updated over time as new questions roll in. If you have any additional questions in the meantime that aren’t answered below, please feel free to contact us at Linkenheimer LLP. We’ll continue to work side by side with all of you during this rebuilding process as we put our great community back together.

Frequently asked questions related to disaster relief for those affected by the fires: 

  1. Can an employer make a payment to an employee for missed time as a result of the fire and have that payment excluded from the employees gross income? No, the payments would be considered taxable wages.
  1. What information is needed to substantiate a casualty loss? To substantiate your loss, you’ll need the following, the type of casualty and date it occurred, proof that you were the owner of the property, or if you were a lessee, that you were contractually liable for the damage, whether a claim for reimbursement exists for which there is a reasonable expectation of recovery and documented […]
By |November 8th, 2019|Fire Relief Info|0 Comments

Thinking About Converting from a C Corporation to an S Corporation?

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The right entity choice can make a difference in the tax bill you owe for your business. Although S corporations can provide substantial tax advantages over C corporations in some circumstances, there are plenty of potentially expensive tax problems that you should assess before making the decision to convert from a C corporation to an S corporation.

Here’s a quick rundown of four issues to consider:

LIFO inventories. C corporations that use last-in, first-out (LIFO) inventories must pay tax on the benefits they derived by using LIFO if they convert to S corporations. The tax can be spread over four years. This cost must be weighed against the potential tax gains from converting to S status.

Built-in gains tax. Although S corporations generally aren’t subject to tax, those that were formerly C corporations are taxed on built-in gains (such as appreciated property) that the C corporation has when […]

By |November 5th, 2019|business, tax implications|0 Comments

At the Very Least, Update the Financials in Your Business Plan

Business consept, Financial graphs

Every new company should launch with a business plan and keep it updated. Generally, such a plan will comprise six sections: executive summary, business description, industry and marketing analysis, management team description, implementation plan, and financials.

Now, ideally, you would comprehensively update each section every year. But if the size, shape and objectives of your company haven’t changed all that much, you may not need to make major revisions to the entire plan. However, at the very least, you should always review and revise your financials.

Explain your route

Lenders, investors and other interested parties understand that descriptions of a business or industry analysis may be subject to interpretation. But financials are a different matter — they need to add up (literally and figuratively) and contain realistic projections in today’s dollars.

For example, suppose a company with $10 million in sales in 2019 expects to double that figure over a three-year […]

By |October 23rd, 2019|business, planning, strategy|0 Comments

Selling Securities by Year End? Avoid the Wash Sale Rule

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If you’re planning to sell assets at a loss to offset gains that have been realized during the year, it’s important to be aware of the “wash sale” rule.

How the rule works

Under this rule, if you sell stock or securities for a loss and buy substantially identical stock or securities back within the 30-day period before or after the sale date, the loss can’t be claimed for tax purposes. The rule is designed to prevent taxpayers from using the tax benefit of a loss without parting with ownership in any significant way. Note that the rule applies to a 30-day period before or after the sale date to prevent “buying the stock back” before it’s even sold. (If you participate in any dividend reinvestment plans, the wash sale rules may be inadvertently triggered when dividends are reinvested under the plan, if you’ve separately sold some of the same stock at a loss within the 30-day period.)

Keep in […]

By |October 22nd, 2019|income tax, individuals, investment, retirement, roth ira|0 Comments

Watch Out for Tax-Related Scams

Scam alert with woman using a laptop

“Thousands of people have lost millions of dollars and their personal information to tax scams,” according to the IRS. Criminals can contact victims through regular mail, telephone calls and email messages. Here are just two of the scams the tax agency has seen in recent months.

  1. Fake property liens. A tax bill is sent from a fictional government agency in the mail. The fake agency may have a legitimate sounding name such as the Bureau of Tax Enforcement. The bill is accompanied by a letter threatening an IRS lien or levy based on bogus overdue taxes. (A levy is a legal seizure of property to satisfy a tax debt. A lien is a legal claim against your property to secure payment of your tax debt.)
  2. Phony calls from the IRS. In this scam, criminals impersonating IRS employees call people and tell them that, if they don’t pay back taxes they owe, they will face arrest. The thieves then demand that the taxpayers pay their tax debts with a gift card, other prepaid cards or a wire transfer.

Important reminders

If you receive a text, letter, email or phone call […]

By |October 8th, 2019|irs|0 Comments

Take Advantage of the Gift Tax Exclusion Rules

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As we head toward the gift-giving season, you may be considering giving gifts of cash or securities to your loved ones. Taxpayers can transfer substantial amounts free of gift taxes to their children and others each year through the use of the annual federal gift tax exclusion. The amount is adjusted for inflation annually. For 2019, the exclusion is $15,000.

The exclusion covers gifts that you make to each person each year. Therefore, if you have three children, you can transfer a total of $45,000 to them this year (and next year) free of federal gift taxes. If the only gifts made during the year are excluded in this way, there’s no need to file a federal gift tax return. If annual gifts exceed $15,000, the exclusion covers the first $15,000 and only the excess is taxable. Further, even taxable gifts may result in no gift tax liability thanks to the unified credit (discussed below).

Note: this discussion isn’t relevant to gifts made from one […]

By |October 1st, 2019|child, gift tax|0 Comments

The Chances of an IRS Audit are Low, But Business Owners Should be Prepared

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Many business owners ask: How can I avoid an IRS audit? The good news is that the odds against being audited are in your favor. In fiscal year 2018, the IRS audited approximately 0.6% of individuals. Businesses, large corporations and high-income individuals are more likely to be audited but, overall, audit rates are historically low.

There’s no 100% guarantee that you won’t be picked for an audit, because some tax returns are chosen randomly. However, completing your returns in a timely and accurate fashion with our firm certainly works in your favor. And it helps to know what might catch the attention of the IRS.

Audit red flags

A variety of tax-return entries may raise red flags with the IRS and may lead to an audit. Here are a few examples:

  • Significant inconsistencies between previous years’ filings and your most current filing,
  • Gross profit margin or expenses markedly different from those of other businesses in your industry, and
  • Miscalculated or unusually high deductions.

Certain types of deductions may be questioned by the IRS because there are strict record-keeping requirements for them • for example, auto and travel expense deductions. In addition, an owner-employee salary that’s inordinately higher or […]

By |September 30th, 2019|audit, business, irs|0 Comments

Are You Engaged in Internet Sales in California?

G S T concept with Quation

Are you engaged in Internet sales in California? In light of changes to sales and use tax that became effective in April, some retailers may not be certain if they must collect and pay over sales and use tax based on aspects of their businesses. The CA Dept. of Tax and Fee Administration has updated Publication 109 (Internet Sales) to add clarity on many issues. One key change is the addition of details that defines what “engaged in business” in CA means and doesn’t mean. For example, “Offering merchandise for sale over the phone, by mail order, or online will generally not, by itself, cause a retailer to be engaged in business in CA.” Go to https://bit.ly/2OClJka and scroll down. If you have questions or would like more info, please contact your Linkenheimer CPA. 

By |August 22nd, 2019|sales tax|0 Comments

The IRS is Targeting Business Transactions in Bitcoin and Other Virtual Currencies

Cryptocurrency and blockchain. Platform creation of digital currency.

Bitcoin and other forms of virtual currency are gaining popularity. But many businesses, consumers, employees and investors are still confused about how they work and how to report transactions on their federal tax returns. And the IRS just announced that it is targeting virtual currency users in a new “educational letter” campaign.

The nuts and bolts

Unlike cash or credit cards, small businesses generally don’t accept bitcoin payments for routine transactions. However, a growing number of larger retailers — and online businesses — now accept payments. Businesses can also pay employees or independent contractors with virtual currency. The trend is expected to continue, so more small businesses may soon get on board.

Bitcoin has an equivalent value in real currency. It can be digitally traded between users. You can also purchase and exchange bitcoin with real currencies (such as U.S. dollars). The most common ways to obtain bitcoin are through virtual currency ATMs […]

By |August 13th, 2019|business, irs, w2|0 Comments