relief

California Tax Updates for July 2nd

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Post 1:

Businesses that hold unclaimed property in California get extra time to file reports. Due to COVID-19, the CA State Controller (SCO) has postponed the due date for holders of such property, including unclaimed wages, to submit their Remit Reports and Remittances for properties reported on their 2019 Notice Reports. Regarding the June 1-15 period for holders to submit their reports and remittances for properties reported on 2019 Notice Reports is extended from June 1, 2020, to August 15, 2020. Holders or agents of holders who are able to submit their Remit Reports and remittances during the original reporting period are encouraged to do so. Contact your Linkenheimer CPA with questions.

Post 2:

As Tax Day approaches, the Franchise Tax Board offers tips to help Californians prepare to file by the July 15 deadline. Among other things, the tips include the following: COVID-19 relief […]

By |July 2nd, 2020|california, tax deadlines|0 Comments

Fortunate Enough To Get A PPP Loan? Forgiven Expenses Aren’t Deductible

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The IRS has issued guidance clarifying that certain deductions aren’t allowed if a business has received a Paycheck Protection Program (PPP) loan. Specifically, an expense isn’t deductible if both:

  • The payment of the expense results in forgiveness of a loan made under the PPP, and
  • The income associated with the forgiveness is excluded from gross income under the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act.

PPP basics

The CARES Act allows a recipient of a PPP loan to use the proceeds to pay payroll costs, certain employee healthcare benefits, mortgage interest, rent, utilities and interest on other existing debt obligations.

A recipient of a covered loan can receive forgiveness of the loan in an amount equal to the sum of payments made for the following expenses during the 8-week “covered period” beginning on the loan’s origination date: 1) payroll costs, 2) interest on any covered mortgage obligation, 3) payment on any covered rent, and 4) covered utility payments.

The law provides that any forgiven loan amount “shall be excluded from gross income.”

Deductible expenses

So the question arises: If you pay for the above expenses with PPP funds, can you then deduct the expenses on your tax […]

By |May 18th, 2020|business, New Tax Laws, small business|0 Comments

The CARES Act Liberalizes Net Operating Losses

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The Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act eliminates some of the tax-revenue-generating provisions included in a previous tax law. Here’s a look at how the rules for claiming certain tax losses have been modified to provide businesses with relief from the novel coronavirus (COVID-19) crisis.

NOL deductions

Basically, you may be able to benefit by carrying a net operating loss (NOL) into a different year — a year in which you have taxable income — and taking a deduction for it against that year’s income. The CARES Act includes favorable changes to the rules for deducting NOLs. First, it permanently eases the taxable income limitation on deductions.

Under an unfavorable provision included in the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (TCJA), an NOL arising in a tax year beginning in 2018 and later and carried over to a later tax year couldn’t offset more than 80% of the taxable income for the carryover year (the later tax year), calculated before the NOL deduction. As explained below, under the TCJA, most NOLs arising in tax years ending after 2017 also couldn’t be carried back to earlier years and used to offset taxable income […]

By |May 4th, 2020|business, deduction, New Tax Laws|0 Comments

Relief From Not Making Employment Tax Deposits Due To COVID-19 Tax Credits

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The IRS has issued guidance providing relief from failure to make employment tax deposits for employers that are entitled to the refundable tax credits provided under two laws passed in response to the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic. The two laws are the Families First Coronavirus Response Act, which was signed on March 18, 2020, and the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act (CARES) Act, which was signed on March 27, 2020.

Employment tax penalty basics

The tax code imposes a penalty for any failure to deposit amounts as required on the date prescribed, unless such failure is due to reasonable cause rather than willful neglect.

An employer’s failure to deposit certain federal employment taxes, including deposits of withheld income taxes and taxes under the Federal Insurance Contributions Act (FICA) is generally subject to a penalty.

COVID-19 relief credits

Employers paying qualified sick leave wages and qualified family leave wages required by the Families First Act, as well as qualified health plan expenses allocable to qualified leave wages, are eligible for refundable tax credits under the Families First Act.

Specifically, provisions of the Families First Act provide a refundable tax credit against an employer’s share of the Social […]

Penalties For Late Property Tax Payments In California Will Be Waived

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Due to the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic, penalties and other charges for late property tax payments in California will be waived. The CA Association of County Treasurers and Tax Collectors (CACTTC) has issued a statement regarding the April 10 tax collection deadline for the second installment of property tax for the 2019-2020 fiscal year. While the CACTTC cannot change the deadline, it can provide relief from the penalties, cost or other charges resulting from tax delinquency due to reasonable cause related to the crisis. The statement also encourages taxpayers to pay electronically. If you have questions, please reach out to your Linkenheimer CPA for help. See answers to frequently asked questions from the CACTTC here: https://bit.ly/3aysXvT 

By |April 8th, 2020|property tax|0 Comments

CARES ACT Changes Retirement Plan and Charitable Contribution Rules

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As we all try to keep ourselves, our loved ones, and our communities safe from the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic, you may be wondering about some of the recent tax changes that were part of a tax law passed on March 27.

The Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act contains a variety of relief, notably the “economic impact payments” that will be made to people under a certain income threshold. But the law also makes some changes to retirement plan rules and provides a new tax break for some people who contribute to charity.

Waiver of 10% early distribution penalty

IRAs and employer sponsored retirement plans are established to be long-term retirement planning accounts. As such, the IRS imposes a penalty tax of an additional 10% if funds are distributed before reaching age 59½. (However, there are some exceptions to this rule.)

Under the CARES Act, the additional 10% tax on early distributions from IRAs and defined contribution plans (such as 401(k) plans) is waived for distributions made between January 1 and December 31, 2020 by a person who (or whose family) is infected with COVID-19 or is economically harmed by it. Penalty-free […]

Cash Payments and Tax Relief for Individuals in New Law

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A new law signed by President Trump on March 27 provides a variety of tax and financial relief measures to help Americans during the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic. This article explains some of the tax relief for individuals in the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act.

Individual cash payments

Under the new law, an eligible individual will receive a cash payment equal to the sum of: $1,200 ($2,400 for eligible married couples filing jointly) plus $500 for each qualifying child. Eligibility is based on adjusted gross income (AGI).

Individuals who have no income, as well as those whose income comes entirely from Social Security benefits, are also eligible for the payment.

The AGI thresholds will be based on 2019 tax returns, or 2018 returns if you haven’t yet filed your 2019 returns. For those who don’t qualify on their most recently filed tax returns, there may be another option to receive some money. An individual who isn’t an eligible individual for 2019 may be eligible for 2020. The IRS won’t send cash payments to him or her. Instead, the individual will be able to claim the credit when filing a 2020 return.

The income thresholds

The […]

By |March 31st, 2020|child, individuals, New Tax Laws, relief, tax planning|0 Comments

FAQs Related to Disaster Recovery and the Fires

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Our CPA’s have compiled a list of 25 frequently asked questions related to fire victims and the recovery process. This document will continue to be updated over time as new questions roll in. If you have any additional questions in the meantime that aren’t answered below, please feel free to contact us at Linkenheimer LLP. We’ll continue to work side by side with all of you during this rebuilding process as we put our great community back together.

Frequently asked questions related to disaster relief for those affected by the fires: 

  1. Can an employer make a payment to an employee for missed time as a result of the fire and have that payment excluded from the employees gross income? No, the payments would be considered taxable wages.
  1. What information is needed to substantiate a casualty loss? To substantiate your loss, you’ll need the following, the type of casualty and date it occurred, proof that you were the owner of the property, or if you were a lessee, that you were contractually liable for the damage, whether a claim for reimbursement exists for which there is a reasonable expectation of recovery and documented […]
By |November 8th, 2019|Fire Relief Info|0 Comments

Some California Employers in Sonoma and Los Angeles Counties Get Extra Time for Tax Responsibilities

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Some California employers in Sonoma and Los Angeles Counties get extra time for tax responsibilities, says the CA Employment Development Dept. (EDD). Those employers who were directly affected by the Kincade and Tick fires, which began on Oct. 23, may request up to a 60-day extension of time from the EDD to file their state payroll reports and deposit payroll taxes without penalty or interest. To get an extension, a written request from the employer must be received within 60 days from the original delinquent date of the payment or return. Please contact your Linkenheimer CPA with questions or for more info: https://bit.ly/331PygJ

Casualty Loss Deductions: You Can Claim One Only for a Federally Declared Disaster

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Unforeseen disasters happen all the time and they may cause damage to your home or personal property. Before the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act, eligible casualty loss victims could claim a deduction on their tax returns. But there are new restrictions that make these deductions much more difficult to take.

What’s considered a casualty for tax purposes? It’s a sudden, unexpected or unusual event, such as a hurricane, tornado, flood, earthquake, or fire; an accident or act of vandalism; or even a terrorist attack.

Unfavorable change

For losses incurred in 2018 through 2025, the TCJA generally eliminates deductions for personal casualty losses, except for losses due to federally declared disasters. For example, during 2019, there were presidential declarations of major disasters in parts of Iowa and Nebraska after severe storms and flooding. So victims there would be eligible for casualty loss deductions.

Note: There’s an exception to the general rule of allowing casualty loss deductions only in federally declared disaster areas. If you have personal casualty gains because your insurance proceeds exceed the tax basis of the damaged or destroyed property, you can deduct personal casualty losses that aren’t due to a federally declared […]

By |April 23rd, 2019|business, deduction, deductions, disaster, New Tax Laws|0 Comments