employer

2020 Q1 Tax Calendar: Key Deadlines for Businesses and Other Employers

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Here are some of the key tax-related deadlines affecting businesses and other employers during the first quarter of 2020. Keep in mind that this list isn’t all-inclusive, so there may be additional deadlines that apply to you. Contact us to ensure you’re meeting all applicable deadlines and to learn more about the filing requirements.

January 31

  • File 2019 Forms W-2, “Wage and Tax Statement,” with the Social Security Administration and provide copies to your employees.
  • Provide copies of 2019 Forms 1099-MISC, “Miscellaneous Income,” to recipients of income from your business where required.
  • File 2019 Forms 1099-MISC reporting nonemployee compensation payments in Box 7 with the IRS.
  • File Form 940, “Employer’s Annual Federal Unemployment (FUTA) Tax Return,” for 2019. If your undeposited tax is $500 or less, you can either pay it with your return or deposit it. If it’s more than $500, you must deposit it. However, if you deposited the tax for the year in full and on time, you have until February 10 to file the return.
  • File Form 941, “Employer’s Quarterly Federal Tax Return,” to report Medicare, Social Security and income taxes withheld in the fourth quarter of 2019. If your tax liability is […]
By |January 10th, 2020|business|0 Comments

Some California Employers in Sonoma and Los Angeles Counties Get Extra Time for Tax Responsibilities

Firefighting

Some California employers in Sonoma and Los Angeles Counties get extra time for tax responsibilities, says the CA Employment Development Dept. (EDD). Those employers who were directly affected by the Kincade and Tick fires, which began on Oct. 23, may request up to a 60-day extension of time from the EDD to file their state payroll reports and deposit payroll taxes without penalty or interest. To get an extension, a written request from the employer must be received within 60 days from the original delinquent date of the payment or return. Please contact your Linkenheimer CPA with questions or for more info: https://bit.ly/331PygJ

Hiring This Summer? You May Qualify for a Valuable Tax Credit.

Is your business hiring this summer? If the employees come from certain “targeted groups,” you may be eligible for the Work Opportunity Tax Credit (WOTC). This includes youth whom you bring in this summer for two or three months. The maximum credit employers can claim is $2,400 to $9,600 for each eligible employee.

10 targeted groups

An employer is generally eligible for the credit only for qualified wages paid to members of 10 targeted groups:

  • Qualified members of families receiving assistance under the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families program,
  • Qualified veterans,
  • Designated community residents who live in Empowerment Zones or rural renewal counties,
  • Qualified ex-felons,
  • Vocational rehabilitation referrals,
  • Qualified summer youth employees,
  • Qualified members of families in the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program,
  • Qualified Supplemental Security Income recipients,
  • Long-term family assistance recipients, and
  • Qualified individuals who have been unemployed for 27 weeks or longer.

For each employee, there’s also a minimum requirement that the employee have completed at least 120 hours of service for the employer, and that employment begin before January 1, 2020.

Also, the credit isn’t available for certain employees who are related to the employer or work more than 50% of the time outside of a trade or business of the employer (for […]

By |June 18th, 2019|business, employer, tax credit|0 Comments

Employers: Be Aware (or Beware) of a Harsh Payroll Tax Penalty

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If federal income tax and employment taxes (including Social Security) are withheld from employees’ paychecks and not handed over to the IRS, a harsh penalty can be imposed. To make matters worse, the penalty can be assessed personally against a “responsible individual.”

If a business makes payroll tax payments late, there are escalating penalties. And if an employer fails to make them, the IRS will crack down hard. With the “Trust Fund Recovery Penalty,” also known as the “100% Penalty,” the IRS can assess the entire unpaid amount against a responsible person who willfully fails to comply with the law.

Some business owners and executives facing a cash flow crunch may be tempted to dip into the payroll taxes withheld from employees. They may think, “I’ll send the money in later when it comes in from another source.” Bad idea!

No corporate protection

The corporate veil won’t shield corporate officers in these cases. Unlike some other liability protections that a corporation or limited liability company may have, business owners and executives can’t escape personal liability for payroll tax debts.

Once the IRS asserts the penalty, it can file a lien or take levy or seizure action […]

By |June 6th, 2019|employer, social security, tax, tax planning|0 Comments

IRS Reminds Employers, Other Businesses of Jan. 31 Filing Deadline

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The Internal Revenue Service today reminds employers and other businesses of the Jan. 31 filing deadline that applies to filing wage statements and independent contractor forms with the government.

The Protecting Americans from Tax Hikes (PATH) Act requires employers to file their copies of Form W-2, Wage and Tax Statement, and Form W-3, Transmittal of Wage and Tax Statements, with the Social Security Administration by Jan. 31. The Jan. 31 deadline also applies to certain Forms 1099-MISC, Miscellaneous Income, filed with the IRS to report non-employee compensation to independent contractors. Such payments are reported in box 7 of this form.

This deadline makes it easier for the IRS to verify income that individuals report on their tax returns and helps prevent fraud. Failure to file these forms correctly and timely may result in penalties. As always, the IRS urges employers and other businesses to take advantage of the accuracy, speed and convenience of filing these forms electronically.

An extension of time to file Forms W-2 is no longer automatic. The IRS will only […]

By |January 29th, 2019|irs, w2|0 Comments

Extended Deadline to Provide Small Employer QSEHRA Notice to Employees

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The IRS has extended the period to provide an initial written notice to eligible employees regarding a Qualified Small Employer Health Reimbursement Arrangement (QSEHRA) under IRC Sec. 9831(d). A QSEHRA is similar to a regular health reimbursement arrangement, but must meet other requirements and is exempt from the market reform penalty. QSEHRAs are available to employers with less than 50 full-time equivalent employees that don’t offer group health plans and can be used to reimburse an employee’s individual health insurance premiums as well as other medical expenses. Although the employer must furnish a written notice to its eligible employees at least 90 days before the beginning of a year for which the QSEHRA is provided, the IRS announced that initial notices aren’t required any earlier than 90 days following the issuance of further guidance from the IRS.

If you have any questions, please contact your Linkenheimer LLP CPA.

 

By |March 2nd, 2017|irs|0 Comments

E-file and E-pay Mandate for Employers (Assembly Bill 1245)

New state law mandates electronic submission of tax returns, wage reports, and payroll tax deposits for all employers.

Beginning January 1, 2017, employers with 10 or more employees will be required to electronically submit employment tax returns, wage reports, and payroll tax deposits to the Employment Development Department (EDD). All remaining employers will be subject to this requirement beginning January 1, 2018. Any employer required under existing law to electronically submit wage reports and/or electronic funds transfer to the EDD will remain subject to those requirements.  For more information, visit FAQs – E-file and E-pay Mandate for Employers.

Benefits of Electronic Filing and Payments

  • Increases data accuracy.
  • Protects data through encryption, which is safer and more secure than paper forms.
  • Reduces paper and mailing costs.
  • Eliminates lost mail.
  • Faster processing of returns and payments.

File and Pay Electronically with e-Services for Business

Employers can use e-Services for Business to comply with the e-file and e-pay mandate. e-Services for Business is a fast, easy, and secure way to manage your employer payroll tax accounts online. With e-Services for Business, you can:

  • Register for an employer payroll tax account number.
  • File returns and reports.
  • Make payroll tax deposits and pay other liabilities.
  • View and update account information.
  • And […]
By |July 26th, 2016|employer|0 Comments

Employers Need to Understand Their Employment Tax Responsibilities

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The IRS has issued a fact sheet to remind business owners how critical it is to understand the various types of employment-related taxes they may be required to deposit and report. This fact sheet provides information on some of the more common employment tax topics posed by business owners, including worker classification, Voluntary Classification Settlement Program (VCSP), fringe benefits, officer compensation, and backup withholding and information return penalties. The fact sheet is available at https://www.irs.gov/uac/Newsroom/General-Employment-Tax-Issues .

If you have any questions, please contact your Linkenheimer CPA at (707) 546-0272.

By |November 18th, 2015|business, employer, irs|0 Comments

Impacts of the Affordable Care Act on Employer/ Business Owner

Beginning in 2015, if you employ at least 100 full-time employees or full-time equivalents (and after 2015, at least 50 full-time employees or equivalents), you may become subject to the employer mandate that was enacted as part of the Affordable Care Act (ACA), and if you fail to meet its requirements, you may owe a nondeductible excise tax.

You could potentially be subject to the excise tax, if any of your full-time employees are certified, as described below, as having received “health care assistance,” and you either: (1) do not offer health care coverage for all of your full-time employees; or (2) offer “minimum essential” coverage under your group health care plan that either is not “affordable,” or does not provide “minimum value” to your employees.

If you do not offer health care coverage to your full-time employees, the excise tax will be $166.67 for any month, i.e., 1/12 of $2,000 for 2015, times the number of your full-time employees during any month, reduced by a 80-person threshold (30 in 2016).

If you do offer health care coverage to your employees, but it is not affordable or does not provide minimum value, the excise tax will be […]

By |February 10th, 2015|affordable care act|1 Comment