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The History of April 15th and Tax Day

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April 15 isn’t most Americans’ favorite day, and that’s because most years, it’s the official, federal tax deadline (for the first time in 65 years, tax day now falls on a different day, July 15, 2020) . Tax Day, as it’s called, has a long and interesting history in the States that goes all the way back to Abe Lincoln’s leadership. Federal income tax was introduced with the Revenue Act of 1861 to help fund the Civil War, and subsequently repealed, re-adopted, and held unconstitutional. The early taxes were based on assessments, not voluntary tax returns. Tax payment dates varied by act.

1861: The First Federal Income Tax 

Abraham Lincoln, who was an American president from 1861 to 1865, proclaimed the first federal income tax his first year in office. 1861—particularly August 5—is the historical day that marks the future-changing decision. At the time, Lincoln announced a 3% tax rate for anyone who made over $800 a year (roughly $24,000 with today’s inflation). The decision was made to help fund the Union’s efforts during the civil war. Though we are still being taxed today, Lincoln’s tax system was repealed in 1871.

1894: Tariff Act of 1894 Rules […]

By |April 15th, 2020|irs, Linkenheimer, New Tax Laws, tax deadlines|0 Comments

COVID-19: IRS Announces More Relief And Details

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In the midst of the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic, Americans are focusing on their health and financial well-being. To help with the impact facing many people, the government has provided a range of relief. Here are some new announcements made by the IRS.

More deadlines extended

As you probably know, the IRS postponed the due dates for certain federal income tax payments — but not all of them. New guidance now expands on the filing and payment relief for individuals, estates, corporations and others.

Under IRS Notice 2020-23, nearly all tax payments and filings that would otherwise be due between April 1 and July 15, 2020, are now postponed to July 15, 2020. Most importantly, this would include any fiscal year tax returns due between those dates and any estimated tax payments due between those dates, such as the June 15 estimated tax payment deadline for individual taxpayers.

Economic Impact Payments for nonfilers

You have also likely heard about the cash payments the federal government is making to individuals under certain income thresholds. The Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act will provide an eligible individual with a cash payment equal to the sum of: $1,200 […]

By |April 14th, 2020|irs, New Tax Laws, relief, tax deadlines|0 Comments

Relief From Not Making Employment Tax Deposits Due To COVID-19 Tax Credits

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The IRS has issued guidance providing relief from failure to make employment tax deposits for employers that are entitled to the refundable tax credits provided under two laws passed in response to the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic. The two laws are the Families First Coronavirus Response Act, which was signed on March 18, 2020, and the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act (CARES) Act, which was signed on March 27, 2020.

Employment tax penalty basics

The tax code imposes a penalty for any failure to deposit amounts as required on the date prescribed, unless such failure is due to reasonable cause rather than willful neglect.

An employer’s failure to deposit certain federal employment taxes, including deposits of withheld income taxes and taxes under the Federal Insurance Contributions Act (FICA) is generally subject to a penalty.

COVID-19 relief credits

Employers paying qualified sick leave wages and qualified family leave wages required by the Families First Act, as well as qualified health plan expenses allocable to qualified leave wages, are eligible for refundable tax credits under the Families First Act.

Specifically, provisions of the Families First Act provide a refundable tax credit against an employer’s share of the Social […]

IRS Extends More Tax Deadlines To Cover Individuals, Trusts, Estates Corporations and Others

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To help taxpayers, the Department of Treasury and the Internal Revenue Service announced today that Notice 2020-23 extends additional key tax deadlines for individuals and businesses.

Last month, the IRS announced that taxpayers generally have until July 15, 2020, to file and pay federal income taxes originally due on April 15. No late-filing penalty, late-payment penalty or interest will be due.

Today’s notice expands this relief to additional returns, tax payments and other actions. As a result, the extensions generally now apply to all taxpayers that have a filing or payment deadline falling on or after April 1, 2020, and before July 15, 2020. Individuals, trusts, estates, corporations and other non-corporate tax filers qualify for the extra time. This means that anyone, including Americans who live and work abroad, can now wait until July 15 to file their 2019 federal income tax return and pay any tax due.

Extension of time to file beyond July 15

Individual taxpayers who need additional time to file beyond the July 15 deadline can request an extension to Oct. 15, 2020, by filing Form 4868 through their tax professional, tax software or using the Free File link on IRS.gov. […]

By |April 9th, 2020|business, filing deadline, irs, tax deadlines|0 Comments

IRS Issues Warning About Coronavirus-Related Scams

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The IRS warned taxpayers to watch out for emails, text messages, websites, and social media attempts related to the coronavirus that request money or personal information. Taxpayers should not click on links from emails that appear to come from the IRS. The IRS and its Criminal Investigation Division have seen a wave of new and evolving phishing schemes against taxpayers. In most cases, the IRS will deposit economic impact payments into the direct deposit account taxpayers previously provided on tax returns. Taxpayers who have previously filed but not provided direct deposit information to the IRS will be able to provide their banking information through a newly designed secure portal on www.irs.gov in mid-April. If the IRS does not have a taxpayer’s direct deposit information, a check will be mailed to the address on file. No one from the IRS will be reaching out to taxpayers by phone, email, mail, or in person asking for information to complete economic impact payments. If you have questions or concerns, please reach out to your Linkenheimer CPA.

By |April 6th, 2020|irs|0 Comments

The New COVID-19 Law Provides Businesses and Employees With More Relief

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On March 27, President Trump signed into law another coronavirus (COVID-19) law, which provides extensive relief for businesses and employers. Here are some of the tax-related provisions in the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act (CARES Act). 

Employee retention credit

The new law provides a refundable payroll tax credit for 50% of wages paid by eligible employers to certain employees during the COVID-19 crisis.

Employer eligibility. The credit is available to employers with operations that have been fully or partially suspended as a result of a government order limiting commerce, travel or group meetings. The credit is also provided to employers that have experienced a greater than 50% reduction in quarterly receipts, measured on a year-over-year basis.

The credit isn’t available to employers receiving Small Business Interruption Loans under the new law.

Wage […]

IRS FAQs Address 90-day Filing and Payment Extension

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The IRS has released a set of Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) that clarifies certain aspects of the 90-day filing and payment extension provided in Notice 2020-18. Among other things, the FAQs explain that Notice 2020-18 postpones the filing and payment of federal income taxes reported on Form 1040, Form 1041 , Form 1120, Form 8960, Form 8991 , and Form 990-T (if that form is due to be filed on 4/15/20). The due date has not been postponed for Form 1065, Form 1065-B , Form 1066, Form 1120-S, payroll taxes, excise taxes, estate and gift taxes, and Form 990-T (if that form is due 5/15/20). The FAQs also provide that the deadline for making contributions to an IRA, HSA, or Archer MSA for 2019 has been extended to 7/15/20. The IRS continues to consider additional guidance on these issues and cautions taxpayers that FAQs are not citable as legal authority. The FAQs can be accessed at www.irs.gov/newsroom/filing-and-payment-deadlines-questions-and-answers If you have questions about how these changes may effect you and your business, please contact your Linkenheimer CPA.

Coronavirus (COVID-19) Tax Relief and California Updates

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As we mentioned in our last post, taxpayers now have more time to file their tax returns and pay any tax owed because of the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic. The Treasury Department and IRS announced that the federal income tax filing due date is automatically extended from April 15, 2020, to July 15, 2020.

Taxpayers can also defer making federal income tax payments, which are due on April 15, 2020, until July 15, 2020, without penalties and interest, regardless of the amount they owe. This deferment applies to all taxpayers, including individuals, trusts and estates, corporations and other non-corporate tax filers as well as those who pay self-employment tax. They can also defer their initial quarterly estimated federal income tax payments for the 2020 tax year (including any self-employment tax) from the normal April 15 deadline until July 15.

No forms to file

Taxpayers don’t need to file any additional forms to qualify for the automatic federal tax filing and payment relief to July 15. However, individual taxpayers who need additional time to file beyond the July 15 deadline, can request a filing extension by filing Form 4868. Businesses who need additional time must file […]

Age-Related Tax and Financial Milestones

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In an era filled with uncertainty, you can count on one thing: time marches on! This article covers some important age-related tax and financial planning milestones that you should keep in mind for yourself and loved ones.

Ages 0–23

The so-called “Kiddie Tax” rules can potentially apply to your child’s (or grandchild’s) investment income until the year he or she reaches age 24. Specifically, a child’s investment income in excess of the applicable annual threshold is taxed at the parent’s marginal tax rate.

Note: For 2018 and 2019, the unfavorable income tax rates for trusts and estates were used to calculate the Kiddie Tax. Recent legislation changed this for 2020 by once again linking the child’s tax rate to the parent’s marginal tax rate. However, you may elect to apply this change to your 2018 and 2019 tax years. If we feel an election would be beneficial for 2018, we will recommend amending your return.

For 2020, the investment income threshold is $2,200. A child’s investment income below the threshold is usually taxed at benign rates (typically 0% for long-term capital gains and dividends and 0%, 10%, or 12% for ordinary investment income and short-term gains). Note […]

By |February 28th, 2020|estate, irs, New Tax Laws, tax implications|0 Comments

Help Protect Your Personal Information By Filing Your 2019 Tax Return Early

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The IRS announced it is opening the 2019 individual income tax return filing season on January 27. Even if you typically don’t file until much closer to the April 15 deadline (or you file for an extension), consider filing as soon as you can this year. The reason: You can potentially protect yourself from tax identity theft — and you may obtain other benefits, too.

Tax identity theft explained

In a tax identity theft scam, a thief uses another individual’s personal information to file a fraudulent tax return early in the filing season and claim a bogus refund.

The legitimate taxpayer discovers the fraud when he or she files a return and is informed by the IRS that the return has been rejected because one with the same Social Security number has already been filed for the tax year. While the taxpayer should ultimately be able to prove that his or her return is the valid one, tax identity theft […]

By |February 6th, 2020|individuals, irs, tax deadlines, tax planning, w2|0 Comments