tax time

Three Questions You May Have After You File Your Return

04_16_19_1081186502_ITB_560x292

Once your 2018 tax return has been successfully filed with the IRS, you may still have some questions. Here are brief answers to three questions that we’re frequently asked at this time of year.

Question #1: What tax records can I throw away now?

At a minimum, keep tax records related to your return for as long as the IRS can audit your return or assess additional taxes. In general, the statute of limitations is three years after you file your return. So you can generally get rid of most records related to tax returns for 2015 and earlier years. (If you filed an extension for your 2015 return, hold on to your records until at least three years from when you filed the extended return.)

However, the statute of limitations extends to six years for taxpayers who understate their gross income by more than 25%.

You’ll need to hang on to […]

By |April 18th, 2019|irs, New Tax Laws, tax planning, tax time|0 Comments

What’s New for 2018 California Tax Returns?

What’s new for 2018 California tax returns? The list of changes is long. That’s why the CA Franchise Tax Board has created a “Taxnews” page, with information about tax filing. The page includes information about credits such as the earned income credit, the new employment credit and the CA Competes credit, plus instructions for many other tax topics.

A few of the highlights include:

Federal Tax Reform

The Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (TCJA) signed into law on December 22, 2017, made changes to the Internal Revenue Code (IRC). In general, California Revenue and Taxation Code does not conform to the changes. California taxpayers continue to follow the IRC as of the specified date of January 1, 2015, with modifications. The IRS issued Notice 2019-11 to provide for a waiver of the estimated tax penalty for taxpayers whose 2018 federal income tax withholding and estimated tax payments fell short of their total tax liability for the year.

This relief is designed to help taxpayers who were unable to properly adjust their withholding and estimated tax payments to reflect an array of changes under the TCJA, the far-reaching tax reform law enacted in December 2017. For California purposes, the TJCA had no general impact to the […]

Tax Deadline is Around the Corner, So Here’s Some Humor to Help You Through It…

So April 15th is just a few days away, and yes, we know the real deadline is the 18th, but we’re telling our clients it’s the 15th (we don’t want to get shoeboxes of receipts next Monday afternoon). To help ease the stress that sometimes is associated with this time of the year, it seems some humor might be appropriate. We hope you enjoy and remember, no dropping off boxes of receipts on the 18th; boxes of chocolate on the other hand… they will be accepted.

“Two things you need to know about taxes. They’ve extended the deadline to April 18, and when you write your check, just make it out to China.” –David Letterman

“Tax day is the day that ordinary Americans send their money to Washington, D.C., and wealthy Americans send their money to the Cayman Islands.” –Jimmy Kimmel

“Because of a holiday, the deadline for taxes is April 18, so you have three extra days to dig through restaurant dumpsters for receipts.” –Jimmy Kimmel

“Worried about an IRS audit?  Avoid what’s called a red flag.  That’s something the IRS always looks for.  For example, say you have some money left in your bank account after […]

By |April 14th, 2016|accounting, Linkenheimer, tax, tax time|0 Comments

Tax Time: What You Need to Know



Every year the tax codes change and last year was no different. The real questions, as we close in on April 15th, are: What are the significant changes that will have an effect on how I prepare my returns for 2012; and, what planning should I be doing now for the current calendar year.
The biggest news, which we’re hoping our clients have heard about at this point, is the passage of the American Taxpayer Relief Act at the beginning of this year. In addition to changing how the Alternative Minimum Tax is calculated on 2012 taxes, it retained the status quo for a number of temporary tax breaks, extending some retroactively and others into the 2013 tax year. Marginal tax brackets also rose a bit, so even if you made a couple thousand dollars more last year, you’ll probably owe the same percentage as you did last year.

Deductions for 2012
The standard deduction for those who don’t itemize rose by $150 for single filers and $300 for joint filers — to $5,950 if you’re filing solo and $11,900 if you’re filing with your spouse. And the amount you get to deduct for both you and your dependents […]